Search CDFAI.org

 
   

  
  • Personal Privacy and Communications Security from the Telegraph to the Internet
    A new paper investigates the global history of communications security. It concludes that the digital age and the introduction of the internet have opened up countries and persons to attack on the cyber commons, leaving liberal democracies the choice of where to define the boundaries of secrecy, privacy and intelligence.
  • Reflections on Re-Balancing the Attacker's Asymmetric Advantage
    A new paper concludes that the computer security community is doomed to play a loosing game defending against constant cyber attacks if it cannot anticipate and combat all potential assailants while an attacker only has to successfully exploit a weakness once (a problem compounded by the language barrier between the computer security community and policy experts.
  • What Makes the Middle East Such a Difficult Place?
    A new paper examines the pride and interest that prevents political confrontation from being resolved in the Middle East (most notably, between Israel and Palestine) for historical, demographic, religious and geopolitical reasons, and concludes that there is nothing in the current relationship indicating a resolution in the near future.
 

In the Media

Putin’s proxies: How much did he control Ukraine’s rebels?

by Stephen Saideman

The Globe and Mail, July 18, 2014

 

One hundred years on, the Great War still has lessons for Canada

by Daryl Copeland  

Embassy, July 2, 2014

 

Blowback: Iraq and the law of unintended consequences

by Daryl Copeland

iPolitics, June 23, 2014

 

ARCHIVES

Policy Paper  

Personal Privacy and Communications Security from the Telegraph to the Internet

by John Ferris

A new paper from John Ferris, Professor of history at the University of Calgary, investigates the global history of communications security. He concludes that the digital age and the introduction of the internet have opened up both countries and individual persons to attack on the cyber commons, leaving liberal democracies the choice of where to define the boundaries of secrecy, privacy and intelligence.

READ PAPER

Policy Paper

Reflections on Re-Balancing the Attacker's Asymmetric Advantage

by Michael Locasto

 

The computer security community is doomed to play a loosing game defending against constant cyber attacks according to a new policy paper from Michael Locasto, a professor with the computer science department at the University of Calgary. Defenders against cyber attack must work to predict and combat all potential assailants while an attacker only has to successfully exploit a weakness once. This problem is further compounded by the language barrier between the computer security community and policy experts.

 

READ PAPER

On the Horizon

 

 

Events Calendar

Click here to see which domestic and international events we are actively tracking 

 


 

  Latest Tweets


  Latest Facebook Posts


Mailing List

Sign-up and receive notices about our latest papers and going's on via e-mail. 

 

 

Monthly Column

 

July 2014
Stephen Harper Was Right

by J. L. Granatstein and William Kaplan

 

 

New from Colin Robertson

  Now Available
Canada got it right on immigration. Now it’s time to lead on refugees

by Colin Robertson

 

The Dispatch

 

Now Available
Summer 2014
Edition of
The Dispatch



   

 

HEAD OFFICE

Canadian Defence &
Foreign Affairs Institute

Suite 1600
530 8th Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta
Canada T2P 3S8

 

 

OTTAWA OFFICE

Canadian Defence &
Foreign Affairs Institute

8 York Street
2nd Floor
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada K1N 5S6

Phone:  (613) 288-2529 
E-mail: contact@cdfai.org
Web: www.cdfai.org

© 2003-2013 Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute.

Site created by Force Ten Design