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  • Stephen Harper's Arctic Paradox
    Significant changes in Canada's foreign policy approach under Stephen Harper have been nowhere more evident than in the government's Arctic policy. New priorities could mean Canadians have damaged their image as a global leader in the region and are missing out on a unique opportunity to benefit from American resources and influence in our shared northern neighbourhood.
  • Jihad versus R2P: The Future of Atrocity Prevention
    With the international community banding together to combat ISIS, the issue of our international legal obligation to stop genocide and atrocities escapes capture. A new paper argues that ISIS represents the intersection between counter-terrorism and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), and asks if countering ISIS and jihadist online propaganda and incitement to commit violence remains strictly a counter-terrorism issue, an R2P issue, or both?
  • The Agendas of State-Owned Enterprises Raise Foreign Policy, Not Just Domestic, Concerns
    A new policy update analyzes the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) within the arena of foreign policy. The author argues that the biggest area of concern is the lack of concern governments and market players have around handling legal transaction that pose national security challenges. Increased situational awareness of this will help determine precisely what SOEs are doing and why.
  • Canada's New Challenges Facing Terrorism at Home
    A new paper addresses the attacks in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Ottawa that happened in October, concluding that these attacks demonstrate that Canada is not immune from terrorism, and that it will become harder to indentify and deter attacks in the future unless a whole-of-government approach is used to combat the challenges posed by Islamic-inspiried terrorism in the short, medium and long-term.
 

In the Media

A new cold war: Denmark gets aggressive, stakes huge claim in Race for the Arctic

by Tristin Hopper

National Post, December 15, 2014

 

Old enemies, new technology
by David Carment and Ariane Sadjed

OpenCanada.org, December 12, 2014

 

David Collins: Afghanistan's aid pitch

by David Collins
Ottawa Citizen, December 3rd, 2014 

ARCHIVES

Policy Paper  

Canada's New Challenges Facing Terrorism at Home

by Michael G. Zekulin 

A new policy paper addresses the attacks in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu and Ottawa that happened in October. He concludes that these attacks demonstrate that Canada is not immune from terrorism, and it will become harder to indentify and deter attacks in the future. A whole-of-government approach should be used to combat the challenges posed by Islamic-inspiried terrorism in the short, medium and long-term.

 

READ PAPER

 

Policy Paper  

Jihad versus R2P:
The Future of Atrocity Prevention

by Kyle Matthews

ISIS has attracted the world's attention over the past months, and with the international community banding together to some extent in order to combat this threat, one issue is getting lost in the debate: our international legal obligation to stop genocide and atrocities. A new policy paper argues that ISIS represents the intersection between counter-terrorism and the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), and asks, does countering ISIS and jihadist online propaganda and incitement to commit violence remain strictly a counter-terrorism issue, an R2P issue, or both?

 

READ PAPER

Policy Update

Stephen Harper's Arctic Paradox

by Joël Plouffe

 

Significant changes in Canada's foreign policy approach under Stephen Harper have been nowhere more evident than in the government's Arctic policy. New priorities could mean Canadians have damaged their image as a global leader in the region and are missing out on a unique opportunity to benefit from American resources and influence in our shared northern neighbourhood.

 

READ PAPER 

 

Policy Update

The Agendas of State-Owned Enterprises Raise Foreign Policy, Not Just Domestic, Concerns 

by Andrew Davenport 


A new policy update analyzes the role of state-owned enterprises (SOEs) within the arena of foreign policy. The author argues that the biggest area of concern is the lack of concern governments and market players have around handling legal transaction that pose national security challenges. Increased situational awareness of this will help determine precisely what SOEs are doing and why. 

 

READ PAPER 

On the Horizon

 

2014/2015
Speakers Series:

"Canada & the World Speaker Series: The Geopolitics of Energy " 

 

International relations and the flow of oil and gas are being closely watched and in some regions significantly realigned. Alberta crude and natural gas are being discounted with these new realities. Ultimately the geopolitics of energy will become more important to international security. Energy for Europe and Middle East sources are but two significant examples of this new reality. Where do alternate energy sources fit into this puzzle?


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Monthly Column

 

December 2014
What’s the Saudi Game?  

by J. L. Granatstein



New from Colin Robertson

  Now Available
The top task for Canadian politicians: Get to know the new U.S. legislators

by Colin Robertson

 

The Dispatch

 

Now Available
Winter 2014
Edition of
The Dispatch



   

 

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