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Advisory Council

Current Advisory Council members listing:

 

Denis Stairs - CHAIR

Peter Harder

David Pratt

Perrin Beatty

Dan Hays

Elinor Sloan

Ian Brodie

Raymond Henault

Christopher Waddell

Jocelyn Coulon

Don Macnamara

Rob Wright

Bob Fowler

John Manley

   

Jack Granatstein

Anne McGrath    

 

 

 

Denis Stairs - CHAIR

Currently Professor Emeritus in Political Science and a Faculty Fellow in the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie, Dr. Denis Stairs attended Dalhousie, Oxford and the University of Toronto.  A former President of the Canadian Political Science Association and a member for six years of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, he was the founding Director of Dalhousie’s Centre for Foreign Policy Studies from 1970 to 1975. 

He served as Chair of his Department from 1980 to 1985 and as Dalhousie’s Vice-President (Academic and Research) from 1988 to 1993.  A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a member of the Board of Directors of the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre, he specializes in Canadian foreign and defence policy, Canada-US Relations and similar subjects. 

 

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Perrin Beatty

The Honourable Perrin Beatty is the President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the 200,000-member Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Canada’s largest and most representative national business association.  Mr. Beatty is the principal spokesperson advocating the policy positions of the Canadian Chamber’s members to the federal government, international organizations, the media and the general public.  Prior to joining the Canadian Chamber in August 2007, Mr. Beatty was the President and Chief Executive Officer of Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters (CME).

 

A descendant of one of Canada’s most prominent manufacturing families, Mr. Beatty grew up in Fergus, Ontario and graduated from the University of Western Ontario in 1971. In 1972 he was elected to the House of Commons as a Progressive Conservative and in 1979 he was appointed Minister of State (Treasury Board) in the government of Joe Clark.  He held six additional portfolios in subsequent Progressive Conservative governments, including National Revenue in 1984, Solicitor General in 1985, National Defence in 1986, Health and Welfare in 1989, Communications in 1991, and Secretary of State for External Affairs in 1993.

 

In 1994, Mr. Beatty joined a number of private sector boards and worked as a consultant in the field of communications. He was a Honourary Visiting Professor with the Department of Political Science, University of Western Ontario.  He wrote a weekly column on government and politics for a major Canadian newspaper. From 1995 - 1999, Mr. Beatty was President and CEO of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

 

Mr. Beatty has served on a number of Canadian government advisory committees, is a member of the advisory council of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Canadian International Council.  In 2008, Mr. Beatty was named Chancellor of the University of Ontario Institute Of Technology.  In 2012, Mr. Beatty became a member of the Board of Directors of Mitsui Canada.

 

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Ian Brodie

Ian Brodie joined The School of Public Policy in 2013. He is Research Director and teaches in
the Master of Public Policy program.

 

From 2006 to 2008, Brodie worked as the Chief of Staff for Canadian Prime Minister Stephen
Harper. In this role, he demonstrated a deep knowledge of the public policy process and the
political context of difficult government decisions. He developed strong experience in dealing
with competing interests and demanding stakeholder organizations. Earlier, serving as Mr.
Harper’s Chief of Staff in opposition, Brodie led the effort to draft Stand up for Canada!, the
Conservative Party's 2006 election platform.

 

Brodie was the first permanent Executive Director of the Conservative Party following the
merger of the Canadian Alliance and the PC Party. He built a professional, national institution
focused on organization and election readiness, with best-in-class fundraising, membership
development and information technology. He also oversaw preparations for the Conservative
Party's successful national convention in Montreal.

 

After leaving government, Brodie moved into international and multi-lateral finance working as Strategic Advisor at the Inter-American Development Bank. He worked as IDB's 'Sherpa' for the 2012 Summit of the Americas in Cartagena and represented IDB at G-20 meetings. He also
worked with Hill & Knowlton Canada advising blue-chip clients on their public affairs strategies and interactions with government.

 

From 1997-2003, Brodie was Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of
Western Ontario. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Calgary and a B.A.
(Hons) in Political Science from McGill University. His 2002 book, Friends of the Court, was thefirst comprehensive study of interest group litigation in Canada. His academic work has been published in Comparative Politics, Canadian Journal of Political Science, and elsewhere.

 

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Jocelyn Coulon

Jocelyn Coulon is the Director of the Peace Operations Research Network, at the Université de Montréal's Centre for International Research and Studies (CÉRIUM) since 2005. He writes a column on international politics for the Montreal daily La Presse.

Previously, he was director of the Montreal campus of the Pearson Peacekeeping Centre from February 1999 to December 2003. He was a member of the PPC board of directors from 2004 to 2007. He is a member of the IDRC board of governors.

In the past few years, he has published a number of books, including, in 1998, Soldiers of Diplomacy. The United Nations, Peacekeeping, and The New World Order, University of Toronto Press, and in 2005, Guide du maintien de la paix 2006 and L'agression: Les États-Unis, l'Irak et le monde, both published by Athéna Éditions.

He is a member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS).

 

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Bob Fowler

During his 38 year Public Service career, Bob Fowler was the Foreign Policy Advisor to Prime Ministers Trudeau, Turner and Mulroney, Deputy Minister of National Defence, Canada’s longest serving Ambassador to the United Nations (where he represented Canada on the Security Council in 1999 and 2000 and issued 2 ground-breaking reports on sanctions-busting in Angola, which cut off UNITA’s access to the arms bazaar and led to the end of the civil war which had ravished Angola for 25 years). He was Ambassador to Italy and the 3 Rome-Based UN Food Agencies, Sherpa for the Kananaskis G8 Summit (for which he chaired the creation of the Africa Action Plan), and the Personal Representative for Africa of Prime Ministers Chrétien, Martin and Harper. Mr. Fowler retired from the Federal Public Service in the fall of 2006, and is now a Senior Fellow at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

 

In July 2008, The Secretary General of the United Nations, Mr. Ban Ki-moon, appointed Mr. Fowler to be his Special Envoy to Niger, with the rank of Under-Secretary-General in the Secretariat of the UN.

 

While acquitting his UN mission, Mr. Fowler and his colleague, Louis Guay, were captured by al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) on 14 December 2008, and held hostage in the Sahara Desert for 130 days. 

 

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Jack Granatstein

Jack Lawrence Granatstein was born in Toronto on 21 May 1939.  He attended Le Collège militaire royal de St-Jean , the Royal Military College, Kingston, the University of Toronto, and Duke University, served in the Canadian Army , then joined the History Department at York University, Toronto where, after taking early retirement, he became Distinguished Research Professor of History Emeritus. Granatstein was a member of the Royal Military College of Canada Board of Governors, and from 1998 to 2000, he was the Director and CEO of the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.   

 

Granatstein has been an Officer of the Order of Canada since 1996 and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada since 1982. His book, The Generals (1993), won the J.W. Dafoe Prize and the UBC Medal for Canadian Biography. Canada’s National History Society named him the winner of the Pierre Berton Award for popular history (2004), and the Canadian Authors Association gave him its Lela Common Award for Canadian History in 2006. In 2008, the Conference of Defence Associations awarded him its 75th Anniversary Book Prize as “the author deemed to have made the most significant positive contribution to the general public’s understanding of Canadian foreign policy, national security and defence during the past quarter century.” He holds a number of honorary degrees.

 

Granatstein writes a monthly newspaper column for CDFAI and in each issue of Legion Magazine. He writes on 20th Century Canadian national history--the military, defence and foreign policy, Canadian-American relations, the public service, and politics and comments regularly on historical questions, defence, and public affairs in the media and speaks frequently here and abroad.  He is the author of numerous scholarly and popular books and articles.

 

He lives in Toronto.

 

Keywords: Canadian History, Military History, Canada-US Relations, Defence and Foreign Policy

 

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Peter Harder

In March 2007, Peter Harder joined the law firm of Fraser Milner Casgrain as Senior Policy Advisor.  He is a member of a number of private sector boards and is the President of the Canada-China Business Council. Mr. Harder is a former Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs and assumed the responsibilities of the Personal Representative of the Prime Minister to the G8 in December 2003.  He was first appointed Deputy Minister in 1991 and had served in that capacity in a number of departments including Treasury Board, Solicitor General, Citizenship and Immigration and Industry Canada.  Mr. Harder first joined the Canadian Foreign Service in 1977. In 2002, he was awarded the Queen’s Jubilee Award.  In 2000, the Governor General presented Mr. Harder with the Prime Minister’s Outstanding Achievement Award for public service leadership.   Mr. Harder was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1952 and was raised in Vineland, Ontario.  He has a BA (Honours) in Political Science from the University of Waterloo, a MA from Queen’s University and an LLD, honoris causa, from the University Waterloo, 2005.

 

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Dan Hays

Dan Hays has been a member of the Macleod Dixon law firm (now Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP) since his call to the Bar in 1966.  He is a senior partner with Norton Rose Fulbright and has been active in different practice areas, most recently in corporate commercial and international operations.  He was appointed to the Senate of Canada by Prime Minister Trudeau in 1984 and retired from the Senate in 2007.

 

During his years in the Senate, Dan held a number of leadership positions and at different times served as Chair of the Standing Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, the Standing Committee on Energy, the Environment and Natural Resources and the Special Committee on Senate Reform 2006.  He has been a proponent of and has written about Senate modernization and reform. 

 

He served as President of the Liberal Party of Canada from 1994 to 1998.  In 1999 he was appointed Deputy Leader of the Government in the Senate, and in 2001, Prime Minister Chretien appointed him Speaker of the Senate, a position he continued to hold under Prime Minister Martin.  Following the 2006 federal general election, he was appointed Leader of the Opposition in the Senate.  On January 22, 2007, he was made a Privy Councillor by Prime Minister Harper.

 

Dan is proud to have served as an Honourary Colonel (now retired) of the King's Own Calgary Regiment.  He is a graduate of the University of Alberta, B.A. 1962 and the University of Toronto, LLB 1965.  Dan lives in Calgary. 

 

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General (Ret'd) Raymond Henault, CMM, MSC, CD

General Ray Henault was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1949. He enrolled in the Canadian Forces in 1968.

 

General Henault is a forty-year veteran of the Canadian Forces.  His military career began in 1968 as a pilot and included a wide variety of command and staff positions including Commander of 444 Tactical Helicopter Squadron, Base Commander CFB Portage la Prairie, Commander of 10 Tactical Air Group, Chief of Staff Operations at Air Command Headquarters in Winnipeg, Deputy Chief of the Air Staff, Deputy Chief of the Defence Staff, and in June 2001, appointment as the Chief of the Defence Staff in Ottawa.  General Henault was in command of the Canadian Forces when 9/11 occurred, and guided and managed the CF response over the course of almost the next four years. In 2004, he was elected by his peers to be the Chairman of the NATO Military Committee in Brussels, Belgium, a position that he assumed from June 2005 until his retirement from the Canadian Forces in 2008. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree and an Honorary Doctorate of Laws from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Manitoba; an Honorary Doctorate of Military Science from the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ontario; and, holds the position of Honorary Professor of the University of Pecs, Hungary.  General Henault is also a graduate of Canada’s National Defence College and the École supérieure de guerre aérienne (ESGA) in Paris. He is the longest-serving 4-star General in Canadian history, and retired from the Canadian Forces in August 2008.  General Henault is now the Strategic Executive Advisor and Chairman of the Board for ADGA Group Consultants in Ottawa, Ontario. He is also a Director on the Board of Airbus Helicopters Canada Ltd, Discovery Air Inc., the Pearson Centre, and the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, and a Senior Fellow at the Centre for Defence and Security Studies at the University of Manitoba.  He is currently the President of the Canadian Defence Association (CDA) Institute in Ottawa. General Henault has 5000 hours of military and civilian flying time and remains active as a pilot.  He resides in Ottawa, ON with his wife Loraine.

 

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Don Macnamara

BGen(Ret'd) Don Macnamara, following a 37 year career in the RCAF and CF, was for 20 years a professor in the Queen's University School of Business and the Queen's Executive Development Centre. The last Chair of the Canadian Institute of Strategic Studies and first Chair of the CIC Strategic Studies Working Group, he is the current Chair of the Board of Governors of the Royal Military College of Canada and serves on the CDFAI Advisory Council.
 

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John Manley

The Honourable John Manley, P.C., O.C., is President and Chief Executive Officer of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives (CCCE).

 

Mr. Manley is a former Deputy Prime Minister of Canada.  He was first elected to Parliament in 1988, and re-elected three times.  From 1993 to 2003 he was a Minister in the governments of Jean Chrétien, serving in the portfolios of Industry, Foreign Affairs, and Finance, in addition to being Deputy Prime Minister.

 

Following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Mr. Manley was named Chair of a Cabinet Committee on Public Security and Anti-terrorism, serving as counterpart to Governor Tom Ridge, the first U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security.  In recognition of the role he played following 9/11, TIME Canada named him “2001 Newsmaker of the Year”.

 

After a 16-year career in politics, Mr. Manley returned to the private sector in 2004.

Since leaving government, Mr. Manley has continued to be active in public policy, as a media commentator, speaker and adviser to governments of differing political stripes.

 

In addition to his role as President and Chief Executive Officer of the CCCE, Mr. Manley serves on the boards of several publicly traded companies and is active in the not-for-profit sector.

An Officer of the Order of Canada, Mr. Manley has received honourary doctorates from the University of Ottawa, Carleton University, and the universities of Toronto and Western Ontario.

 

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Anne McGrath

Consistently identified as one of the 100 most influential people in government and politics in Ottawa, Anne McGrath brings extensive experience and knowledge of federal politics, the trade union movement, the NGO sector, social justice organizations, and the NDP at every level.

 

Anne served as chief of staff to Official Opposition New Democratic Party leaders Jack Layton, Nycole Turmel, and Thomas Mulcair, where she provided political advice to both the leader and caucus.

 

Anne is credited with professionalizing NDP caucus operations, leading an effective staff team of more than 700, and providing critical strategic advice, including working as part of the core team in the historic 2011 election that resulted in the NDP gaining official opposition status.

 

Anne also served as President of the New Democratic Party of Canada from 2006 until 2009.

 

Throughout her career, Anne has been actively involved in education, organized labour, and equality issues. Prior to the October 2008 general election, Anne was National Equality Director for the Canadian Union of Public Employees.

 

Anne has held a variety of positions with not-for-profit organizations including working as Canadian Programme Officer for OXFAM-Canada and Community Development Team Leader and Senior Education Officer for the Canadian Mental Health Association.

 

Anne is portrayed by Gemini-award winning actress Wendy Crewson in the movie “Jack – The Jack Layton Story”.

 

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David Pratt

David Pratt is an independent consultant. Most recently, he spent five months in Baghdad, Iraq as a Senior Parliamentary Expert with the USAID sponsored Iraq Legislative Strengthening Program – currently the largest legislative capacity building project in the world. From 2004-2008, he served as Special Advisor to the Secretary General of the Canadian Red Cross (CRC) where his focus was on humanitarian issues. He also led the CRC’s ‘Auxiliary to Government’ project which promoted a new relationship between the CRC and governments at all levels. Mr. Pratt served as an elected representative at the municipal, regional and federal levels for 16 years. He was first elected to the House of Commons in 1997 and was Chair of the Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs from 2001 to 2003. He served as Canada’s 36th Minister of National Defence in 2003-04.

 

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Elinor Sloan 

Elinor Sloan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University, Ottawa, and is a former defence analyst with Canada’s Department of National Defence. She is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada (BA), the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton (MA), and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (PhD).

Dr. Sloan's research interests include: the defence policies and military capabilities (army, navy, air force) of Canada, the United States, major NATO allies, Australia and China; NORAD and ballistic missile defence; and the Arctic.

 

Her books include The Revolution in Military Affairs (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002); Security and Defence in the Terrorist Era (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005 & 2010); Military Transformation and Modern Warfare (Praeger Publishers, 2008); and Modern Military Strategy (Routledge, 2012).

 

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian Forces, Canadian military, Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, Canadian Army, US defence policy, US military, ballistic missile defence, NATO, NORAD, China military, rare earths, satellites, RADARSAT, Arctic, space

 

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Christopher  Waddell 

Christopher Waddell is an associate professor and director of Carleton University’s School of Journalism and Communication in Ottawa. He also holds the school’s Carty Chair in Business and Financial Journalism.

 

He joined Carleton in July 2001 after 10 years at CBC Television News. From 1993 to 2001, he was the network's Parliamentary Bureau Chief in Ottawa. From 1995 to 2001 he was also Executive Producer News Specials for CBC Television, responsible for all national news specials and federal and provincial election and election night coverage during those years.

 

Between 1984-91 he was at the Globe and Mail where he served in a number of positions including reporter in Report on Business, economics reporter in Ottawa covering among other things the Canada-US free trade negotiations, Ottawa bureau chief in the 1988 federal election In the period from 1990-91 he was associate editor and then national editor of the paper

 

He has won two National Newspaper Awards for business reporting and programs he supervised at CBC Television won six Gemini awards for television excellence.

 

He received a Ph. D in Canadian history from York University in Toronto in 1981, completing a thesis on price and wage controls and consumer rationing in Canada in World War II.

 

With David Taras of Mount Royal University in Calgary he is the editor of and a contributor to How Canadians Communicate IV: Media and Politics published in May 2012 by Athabaska University Press and How Canadians Communicate V: Sports to be published by Athabaska in 2014.

 

 

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Rob Wright

Rob Wright served as Canadian Ambassador to China from 2005-2009. He served as Ambassador to Japan from 2001-2005.

 

From 1995-2001 he was Canadian Deputy Minister for International Trade.

 

Over his 38 years in public service in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade other appointments included:

 

Deputy Head of the Canadian Embassy in Washington,
Director General responsible for Canada-U.S. relations,
Deputy Head of the Canadian Delegation to the WTO Uruguay Round of Trade Negotiations, and,
Delegation to the GATT Tokyo Round of Trade Negotiations.

He has also served as a Director of Export Development Canada (EDC), Chairman of the Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) and Commissioner of the Northern Pipeline Agency. During his appointment in China he was concurrently accredited as Canadian Ambassador to Mongolia.

 

He was born in Montreal and attended McGill University.

 

He retired from public service in 2009.  In addition to enjoying retirement, he writes, lectures and consults on Canada’s relations with China and Japan and on Canada’s foreign and trade policies.

 

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