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Fellows

The Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute (CDFAI) “Fellows” program consists of experts in Canadian defence, foreign affairs, and development policy from across Canada. Some are affiliated with academic institutions and some have extensive backgrounds in diplomatic, aid or military pursuits. They have agreed to affiliate themselves with CDFAI to create a core of expertise that the Institute can draw upon for its research projects, its role as a responder to media contacts, and to fill the increasing demand for speakers on these topics. All of our Fellows regularly contribute to our quarterly newsletter. Please see below for an alphabetical list of the CDFAI Fellows and the key words they have chosen to describe their areas of expertise. For further information on communicating with the CDFAI Fellows, please contact:

Sarah Magee

Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute

Phone: (613) 288-2529

contact@cdfai.org

 

Current Research Fellows listing:

 

David Bercuson

Frank Harvey

John Noble

Jean-Christophe Boucher

Bernd Horn

Roland Paris

Brian Bow

Brian Job

Joël Plouffe

David Carment

Tom Keenan

Colin Robertson

David Collins

Whitney Lackenbauer

Stephen Saideman

Mark Collins

Philippe Lagassé

Hugh Segal

Barry Cooper

Natalia Loukacheva

Elinor Sloan
Daryl Copeland George Macdonald

Gary Soroka

Laura Dawson

Paul Maddison Hugh Stephens

Neil Desai

Pierre Martin

David Curtis Wright
Ferry de Kerckhove Kyle Matthews    

Jack Granatstein

Robert Muggah    

 

 

David Bercuson 

David Bercuson was born in Montreal in August 1945. He attended Sir George Williams University, graduating in June 1966 with Honours in History and winning the Lieutenant-Governor's Silver Medal for the highest standing in history. After graduation he pursued graduate studies at the University of Toronto, earning an MA in history in 1967 and a Ph.D. in 1971.

 

Dr. Bercuson has published in academic and popular publications on a wide range of topics specializing in modern Canadian politics, Canadian defence and foreign policy, and Canadian military history. He has written, coauthored, or edited over 30 popular and academic books and does regular commentary for television and radio. He has written for the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, the Calgary Herald, the National Post and other newspapers.

 

In 1988, Bercuson was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and in May 1989, he was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies at The University of Calgary. In 1997 he was appointed Special Advisor to the Minister of National Defence on the Future of the Canadian Forces. He was a member of the Minister of National Defence’s Monitoring Committee from 1997 to 2003. Since January 1997 he has been the Director of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary. He is also the Director of Programs for the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, which is based in Calgary.

 

Dr. Bercuson’s newest book is The Fighting Canadians: Our Regimental History from New France to Afghanistan, published by HarperCollins.

 

Dr. Bercuson is Honorary Lieutenant Colonel of the 41 Combat Engineer Regiment, a Land Force Reserve military engineer unit of the Canadian Forces.

 

Dr. Becuson served on the Advisory Council on National Security and is a member of the Board of Governors, RMC.

 

In 2002 Dr. Bercuson was awarded the J. B. Tyrrell Historical Medal from the Royal Society of Canada. In 2003, he was appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada.

 

He recently became the recipient of the 2004 Vimy Award sponsored by the Conference of Defence Association Institute (CDAI) which recognizes Canadians who have made a significant and outstanding contribution to the defence and security of our nation and the preservation of our democratic values.

 

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian foreign policy, Canadian security policy, the Canadian forces, Canadian military history, Canada-US defence relations, Canada-NATO defence relations

 

 

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Jean-Christophe Boucher

Jean-Christophe Boucher is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Political Science, MacEwan University. His is currently a Research Fellow at the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies at Dalhousie University; Senior Fellow at the Centre interuniversitaire de recherché sur les relations internationales du Canada et du Québec; and book review editor for the Canadian Foreign Policy Journal. He holds a BA in History from the University of Ottawa, a MA in Philosophy from the Université de Montréal and a PhD in Political Science from Université Laval. He specializes in international relations, with an emphasis on peace and security issues, Canadian foreign and defence policies, and methodology.

 

His current research interests focus on Canadian foreign and defence policy. First, his research looks into the domestic political ramifications of Canada’s mission in Afghanistan since 2001. Second, his interest concentrates on identifying and empirically measuring the influence of cultural variables in the formulation and implementation Canada’s international policy. Finally, his research project examines the relationship between media, public opinion, and Canadian foreign policy. His second research path concentrates on the causes of conflict management in international crises since the end of the Second World War. He is particularly interested in understanding, conceptualizing, and measuring non-events in international relations.

 

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Brian Bow

Brian Bow (BA UBC, MA York, PhD Cornell) is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Dalhousie University, and a Senior Fellow at American University’s Center for North American Studies (CNAS). He has previously been a visiting researcher at the Woodrow Wilson Center, American University, Georgetown University, Carleton University, and the Australian National University. His work has been supported by major grants and awards from SSHRC, Fulbright Foundation, PIERAN, Mellon Foundation, MacArthur Foundation, and the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library.
 
Most of his research has been concerned with North American regional politics, US-Canada, and US-Mexico relations, but he is more generally interested in diplomatic norms and practices, coercive bargaining, regional security cooperation, and the links between domestic institutions and international policy coordination. His first book, The Politics of Linkage: Power, Interdependence, and Ideas in Canada-US Relations was awarded the Donner Prize for 2009. He has also co-edited volumes on Canadian foreign policy (An Independent Foreign Policy for Canada?, 2008) and on Mexico’s security challenges in regional perspective (The State and Security in Mexico, 2012), and numerous journal articles and book chapters. He is currently working on two books on North American regional politics: a monograph on the history of regional integration (The Making and Unmaking of North America), and an edited volume on post-NAFTA regional policy-coordination (Building without Architecture).

 

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David Carment

David Carment is a Professor of International Affairs at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University, Ottawa. He served as Director of the Centre for Security and Defence Studies at Carleton University from 2002-2004. His recent books include, Peacekeeping Intelligence, Conflict Prevention: From Rhetoric to Reality, Using Force to Prevent Ethnic Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Evidence and Conflict Prevention: Path to Peace or Grand Illusion? In addition Carment serves as the principal investigator for the Country Indicators for Foreign Policy project. His most recent work focuses on developing failed state risk assessment and early warning methodologies evaluating models of third party intervention.

In 2000-2001 Carment was a Fellow at Harvard University's Belfer Center. While there he contributed an article on peacekeeping for Harvard International Review and a co-authored a paper on "Bias and Intervention" for the BCSIA Working Paper Series.

 

Keywords: Ethnic conflict, communication technologies in conflict analysis & resolution, early warning, peacekeeping, conflict prevention, peace building & security issues in South and Southeast Asia, Eastern Europe & Africa

 

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David Collins

David Collins spent over thirty years in the Canadian Diplomatic Service, serving latterly as ambassador or high commissioner in Romania, Pakistan, Malaysia and Kenya. In his early career as a senior trade commissioner he had assignments in the USA, Poland, Turkey, Brussels Nato, and Korea. In Ottawa he served as Senior Departmental Assistant to the International Trade Minister, as Director General International and Industry Programmes at National Defence and as Inspector General of the Foreign Service. He also did a spell back at Nato HQ as Director Defence Partnership and Cooperation. In the summer of 2013 he served as interim ambassador in Kabul, Afghanistan.  

 

Mr Collins holds BA, BComm and MSc degrees from Queens, Concordia and Durham universities in history and politics, and business studies. He completed the Senior Executive Development Programme at the Banff School of Advanced Management and qualified as a Chartered Secretary. He was commissioned into the Royal Canadian Navy under the Reserve Officers University Training Plan and served in the Reserve for seventeen years.  

 

He is currently a member of the programme advisory committee of the Canadian Ditchley Foundation, a director of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute, a director of the Canadian International Council (Victoria Branch) and, from 2014, a Fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute. He writes and gives the odd public lecture.  

 

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Mark Collins

Mark Collins was a research assistant for Documents on Canadian External Relations, Vol. 6, 1936 - 39 (1972), for Volumes 2-3 of Mike: The Memoirs of the Rt. Hon. Lester B. Pearson (1973, 1975) and for One Canada: Memoirs of the Right Honourable John G. Diefenbaker(1975).

He served with the Department of External Affairs from 1974-1988, with postings in Pakistan (1975-77, also covering Afghanistan) and Yugoslavia (1984-87, also covering Bulgaria); from 1982-84 he was seconded to the Intelligence Advisory Committee Secretariat at the Privy Council Office as Current Intelligence Coordinator.

Mr Collins then worked for Solicitor General Canada (as a normal bureaucrat!) from 1988-1997 on various aspects of security and counter-terrorism policy, as well as on Canadian relations with the European Community/Union respecting various interior ministry matters. He finished his career as a public servant with the Canadian Coast Guard from 1997-2002, mainly engaged in federal emergency preparedness planning involving the Department of Fisheries and Oceans as a whole.

After his retirement Mr Collins eventually fell into the blogging trap and has become a major contributor to the CDFAI's The 3DS Blog (as a firm believer in OSINT). He has read Aviation Week and Space Technology for many years and has had a personal subscription quite a while.

Mr Collins has a B.A in History (with distinction) from Carleton University, 1970.

Keywords: Defence issues, Canadian defence and security policy, military history, international relations.

 

 

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Barry Cooper

Barry Cooper, a fourth generation Albertan, was educated at Shawnigan Lake School, the University of British Columbia and Duke University (PhD, 1969). He taught at Bishop's University, McGill, and York University before coming to the University of Calgary in 1981. He has been a visiting professor in Germany and the United States. His teaching and research has tried to bring the insights of Western political philosophers to bear on contemporary issues, from the place of technology and the media in Canada, to the debate over the constitutional status of Quebec and Alberta, to current military and security policy. Cooper has published 30 books and over 150 articles and papers that reflect the dual focus of his work; most recently (with Lydia Miljan) he wrote Hidden Agendas: How Canadian Journalists Influence the News published by UBC Press (2003). In the spring of 2004, New Political Religions: An Analysis of Modern Terrorism was published by the University of Missouri Press. In 2009 he edited Tilo Schabert’s  How World Politics is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany.  He publishes a regular column in the Calgary Herald and other CanWest Global papers.

Cooper has lectured extensively in Europe, the United States, India, Australia and China. He has received numerous on-going research grants from public and private Canadian, French, German, and American granting agencies. In addition he has received two major awards, the Konrad Adenauer Award from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, and a Killam Research Fellowship.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.

Keywords:
Terrorism, Canadian defence and security policy, Canada-US relations

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Daryl Copeland

Daryl Copeland, Senior Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, is an analyst, author, educator and consultant specializing in the relationship between science, technology, diplomacy, and international policy. His book, Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations, was released in 2009 by Lynne Rienner Publishers and is cited as an essential reference by the editors of Oxford Bibliographies Online. A frequent public speaker, Mr. Copeland comments regularly for the national media on global issues and public management, and has written over 100 articles for the scholarly and popular press. His work has appeared in many anthologies, as well as in the International Journal, World Politics Review, Foreign Policy in Focus, The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, Embassy, The Mark, iPolitics and elsewhere. He was awarded the 2010 Molot Prize for best article published in Canadian Foreign Policy (“Virtuality, Diplomacy and the Foreign Ministry”, 15:2).


From 1981 to 2011 Mr. Copeland served as a Canadian diplomat with postings in Thailand, Ethiopia, New Zealand and Malaysia. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was elected a record five times to the Executive Committee of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers. From 1996-99 he was National Program Director of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs in Toronto and Editor of Behind the Headlines, Canada’s international affairs magazine. In 2000, he received the Canadian Foreign Service Officer Award for his “tireless dedication and unyielding commitment to advancing the interests of the diplomatic profession.”

Among his positions at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa, Mr. Copeland has worked as Senior Intelligence Analyst, South and Southeast Asia; Deputy Director for International Communications; Director for Southeast Asia; Senior Advisor, Public Diplomacy; Director of Strategic Communications Services; and, Senior Advisor, Strategic Policy and Planning. He was DFAIT representative to the Association of Professional Executives (APEX) 2001-06.

 

Mr. Copeland teaches at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and is Visiting Professor at the London Academy of Diplomacy (UK) and Otago University (NZ). He serves as a peer reviewer for University of Toronto Press, Canadian Foreign Policy, the International Journal and The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, and is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Place Branding and Public Diplomacy. From 2009-11 he was Adjunct Professor and Senior Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. In 2009 he was a Research Fellow at the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy.

 

Mr. Copeland grew up in downtown Toronto, and received his formal education at the University of Western Ontario (Gold Medal, Political Science; Chancellor’s Prize, Social Sciences) and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Canada Council Special MA Scholarship). He has spent years backpacking on six continents, and enjoys travel, photography, arts and the outdoors.

 

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Laura Dawson

Laura Dawson is the President of Dawson Strategic and provides advice to business on cross-border trade, market access and regulatory issues.  Previously, she served as senior advisor on U.S.-Canada economic affairs at the United States Embassy in Ottawa. 

 

Dawson contributed to the launch of the U.S.-Canada Regulatory Cooperation Council, the Border Vision Strategy, and the bilateral Government Procurement Agreement.  She is a Public Policy Scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars and a Senior Fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute and a member of the International Economic Council of the CD Howe Institute.

 

Her client work focuses on advocacy and strategic planning in subjects including cross-border trade, investor-state dispute settlement, labor mobility, government procurement, technical barriers, energy, telecommunications, financial services, softwood lumber, foreign investment review and corporate-social responsibility in the extractive sector.


From 1998 to 2008, she was a senior associate at the Centre for Trade Policy and Law advising governments in developing and transition economies on trade and investment issues. Dawson taught international trade, Canada-U.S. relations and policy analysis at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs and holds a PhD in political science.

Email: ldawson@dawsonstrat.com

Web: www.dawsonstrat.com

Twitter: @dawsonstrategic

LinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/pub/laura-dawson/13/2b/b12

 

 

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Neil Desai

Neil Desai is a Fellow with the Canadian Defense and Foreign Affairs Institute and the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto.


He previously served as Chief of Staff to the Minister of International Development (Canada). He was appointed by the Minister and Prime Minister in 2011 and was successfully re-appointed to the post in 2012. Neil led a team providing strategic advice on policy, communications, grants totalling $3-billion annually, operations, stakeholder and parliamentary affairs to the Minister on Canada’s international development portfolio and other Government of Canada priorities. He put forward and led the implementation of a transformative agenda for the Canadian International Development Agency that included private sector led development initiatives and the merger with the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade. He was named one of the top Canadians influencing Canadian foreign policy by Embassy Magazine and one of the top 99 young foreign policy professionals by the US-based Diplomatic Courier magazine.

 

Prior to his return to the Government of Canada, Neil served as Director of Programs and Communications at the Munk School of Global Affairs located at the University of Toronto. In this role, he supported the development of the school’s research agenda and public affairs efforts. He also led practical workshops on international affairs for students in the school’s signature, Masters of Global Affairs program. He also directed various research projects on behalf of the school.

 

Neil previously served with the Government of Canada as Manager, Strategic Initiatives to the Prime Minister of Canada from 2007-2010. In this capacity, Neil led projects on behalf of, and provided political advice to, the PM on issues pertaining to foreign affairs, immigration, international trade and competitiveness.

 

Before entering government, Neil was the Ontario Director of the Canadian Taxpayers Federation. He appeared regularly on television and radio to provide commentary on issues of government accountability, fiscal management and tax policy. He also wrote editorials that appeared in regional and national media.

 

Neil holds a master’s degree in international political economy from the London School of Economics. He attended Princeton University for post-graduate studies in economics and completed a bachelor’s degree with honours from Carleton University.

 

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Ferry de Kerckhove 

Mr. de Kerckhove was born in Belgium in 1947.  After attending secondary school Graduate l in France, he did his military service in 1965-66 (2nd Lieutenant Tanks).  He has a B.Soc. Sc. Honours in Economics, an M.A. in Political Science from the University of Ottawa and pursued Ph.D. Studies at Laval University in Québec City.  Mr. de Kerckhove has published several papers on international relations as well as on the relationship between the Muslim world and the West in specialized journals.

After working as an intern at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), Mr. de Kerckhove became a Researcher at the Québec Centre for International Relations and then later headed up the International Security Section at the Canadian Institute for International Affairs (Québec section).

In September 1973, Mr. de Kerckhove entered the Canadian Foreign Service.  After a stint in European Affairs, he was posted as Third Secretary to the Canadian Embassy in Tehran.  When Mr. de Kerckhove returned to Canada in 1976, he became Assistant Secretary, Inter-Departmental Committee on External Relations then moved to East European Affairs (Yugoslavia, Hungary, Romania, Bulgaria and Albania).  From 1978 to 1981, he was responsible for Canada-France relations. From 1981 to 1985, he was Economic Counsellor at the Canadian Delegation to NATO.

Back in Canada, Mr. de Kerckhove became Deputy Director of the Political and Strategic Analysis Division, then Director of the Economic and Trade Analysis Division in the Policy Planning Bureau.  In 1989, he became Director, Economic Relations with Developing Countries Division.  In September 1992, he was posted to Moscow as Minister and Deputy Head of Mission.

Mr. de Kerckhove returned to Ottawa in September 1995 to become Associate Chief Air Negotiator.  In January 1996, he became Deputy Head of the Policy Branch and Director-General, Federal-Provincial Relations in  Foreign Affairs and International Trade.  He remained in this position until being named Canada s High Commissioner to the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in August 1998. He spent three years in Islamabad. On September 13, 2001, Mr. Ferry de Kerckhove presented his credentials as Ambassador to the Republic of Indonesia. He was also accredited to Timor Leste.

Mr. de Kerckhove returned to Ottawa in September 2003 and joined the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Ottawa as a Canadian Center for Management Development Diplomat in Residence.

On August 9th, 2004, he returned to the Department of Foreign Affairs and became Director General, International Organizations. In July 2006, he added to his responsibilities the function of Personal representative of the Prime Minister for Francophonie.

From September 10th 2008 to September 10 2011, Mr. de Kerckhove was in Cairo as ambassador to the Arab Republic of Egypt.

He retired from the Foreign Service on September 23d, 2011.
 

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Jack Granatstein

Jack Lawrence Granatstein was born in Toronto on 21 May 1939.  He attended Le Collège militaire royal de St-Jean , the Royal Military College, Kingston, the University of Toronto, and Duke University, served in the Canadian Army , then joined the History Department at York University, Toronto where, after taking early retirement, he became Distinguished Research Professor of History Emeritus. Granatstein was a member of the Royal Military College of Canada Board of Governors, and from 1998 to 2000, he was the Director and CEO of the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.   

 

Granatstein has been an Officer of the Order of Canada since 1996 and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada since 1982. His book, The Generals (1993), won the J.W. Dafoe Prize and the UBC Medal for Canadian Biography. Canada’s National History Society named him the winner of the Pierre Berton Award for popular history (2004), and the Canadian Authors Association gave him its Lela Common Award for Canadian History in 2006. In 2008, the Conference of Defence Associations awarded him its 75th Anniversary Book Prize as “the author deemed to have made the most significant positive contribution to the general public’s understanding of Canadian foreign policy, national security and defence during the past quarter century.” He holds a number of honorary degrees.

 

Granatstein writes a monthly newspaper column for CDFAI and in each issue of Legion Magazine. He writes on 20th Century Canadian national history--the military, defence and foreign policy, Canadian-American relations, the public service, and politics and comments regularly on historical questions, defence, and public affairs in the media and speaks frequently here and abroad.  He is the author of numerous scholarly and popular books and articles.

 

He lives in Toronto.

 

Keywords: Canadian History, Military History, Canada-US Relations, Defence and Foreign Policy

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Frank P. Harvey

Frank P. Harvey was appointed Eric Dennis Memorial Chair of Government and Politics in 2013 (Dalhousie University), and held the position of University Research Professor of International Relations from 2008-2013. He served as Associate Dean of Research in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (2011-2013), held the 2007 J. William Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Canadian Studies, served as Director of the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, and is currently a Senior Research Fellow with the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute. His most recent book, Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic and Evidence (2011, Cambridge University Press) received the 2013 Canadian Political Science Association Book Prize in International Relations. His other books include The Homeland Security Dilemma: Fear, Failure and Future of American Insecurity (2008, Routledge); Smoke and Mirrors: Globalized Terrorism and the Illusion of Multilateral Security (University of Toronto Press, 2004) – Runner-up 2004-05 Donner Book Prize, and finalist 2005-2006 Harold Adam Innis book prize; Millennium Reflections on International Studies (co-edited with Michael Brecher, University of Michigan Press, 2002); Using Force to Prevent Ethnic Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Evidence (with David Carment, Praeger, 2001); Conflict in World Politics: Advances in the Study of Crisis, War and Peace (co-edited with Ben Mor, Macmillan Press 1998); and The Future’s Back: Nuclear Rivalry, Deterrence Theory and Crisis Stability After The Cold War (McGill-Queen’s, 1997). He has published widely on post-9/11 security, the Iraq war, American foreign and security policy, nuclear and conventional deterrence, coercive diplomacy, proliferation, crisis decision-making, protracted ethnic conflict and national missile defence in International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Politics, International Journal, International Negotiation, Security Studies, International Political Science Review, Canadian Journal of Political Science, and Conflict Management and Peace Science (among others). His commentaries have appeared in the Globe and Mail, National Post, iPolitics, Calgary Herald, Ottawa Citizen, and Chronicle Herald. Professor Harvey received Dalhousie’s Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching (2012), Dalhousie’s Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award (2009), the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998), and the Burgess Research Award (2000). He was a NATO Research Fellow from 1998-2000 and has received several grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Department of National Defence and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

  

Keywords: Globalization and terrorism, unilateral vs. multilateral approaches to security, comparative multilateralism, WMD proliferation, US & Canadian foreign, security and defence policy, homeland and continental security, ballistic missile defence, nuclear and conventional deterrence, NATO military strategy and third-party intervention, peacekeeping and humanitarian intervention

 

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Bernd Horn

Colonel Bernd Horn, OMM, MSM, CD, PhD is a retired Regular Force infantry officer who has held key command and staff appointments in the Canadian Armed Forces, including Deputy Commander of Canadian Special Operations Forces Command, Commanding Officer of the 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment and Officer Commanding 3 Commando, the Canadian Airborne Regiment.  During his 30 year career he deployed to Cyprus, Rwanda, Bosnia-Hercegovina and Afghanistan.  Dr. Horn is also an adjunct professor of history at the Royal Military College of Canada and Norwich University.  He has authored, co-authored, edited or co-edited 38 books and numerous chapters / articles on military history, special operations forces, leadership and military affairs.    

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Brian Job

Brian L. Job (PhD, Indiana University) is Professor of Political Science and a resident Faculty Associate of the Liu Institute.  He joined the UBC faculty in 1989, having previously been on the faculty of the University of Minnesota.  From 1992 – 2010, he served as Director of the Centre of International Relations and coincidentally directed UBC’s Security and Defence Forum Program.  His current teaching and research interests concern international security—more specifically, the evolving security order of the Asia Pacific, intrastate conflict, human security, and Canadian foreign and security policies. At present, he is engaged in research and writing (in company with graduate students) on arms competition in Asia, on the normative and practical dilemmas associated with the Responsibility to Protect and the protection of civilians in conflict (especially as these concern Asian states), and on the paths to regional security cooperation.  Job is involved in regional Asia Pacific, expert networks, particularly with the Council of Security Cooperation in the Asia Pacific (CSCAP), and served as Editor of the annual CSCAP Regional Security Outlook from 2007-2012. Job is a Senior Fellow of the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and edits the Foundation’s Canada Asia Agenda Internet bulletin. He has been a visiting professor at Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo; Nanyang Technical University, Singapore; and the Australian National University.

 

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Tom Keenan

Dr. Thomas P. Keenan is a Professor in the Faculty of Environmental Design, Adjunct Professor of Computer Science and Research Fellow at the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.  His research focuses on computer security and the social implications of technology.  With a background as a Systems Analyst and Systems Programmer for large mainframe computers, he taught Canada’s first computer security course in 1976.  He co-wrote and hosted the 1984 CBC IDEAS radio series “Crimes of the Future” and is the author of a forthcoming book on creepiness in technology.  He holds a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy, a Master of Science (Engineering) degree in Mathematical Methods and Operations Research and a Master of Arts and a Doctorate in Education, all from Columbia University.  He participated in the 1983 Department of Justice consultation that led to Canada’s first computer crime law, and has served as an expert witness in several court cases.  

 

A frequent contributor to the media and public discourse about technology, he was awarded the 2012 NSERC Award for Science Promotion.  He holds numerous professional designations including Information Systems Professional of Canada (I.S.P.), and Information Technology Certified Professional (ITCP) and is a Fellow of the Canadian Information Processing Society.  He received the Queen’s Jubilee Commemorative Medal in 2003 and the Order of the University of Calgary in 2007.  He currently serves on the boards of the SEEDS Foundation and the Information and Communications Technology Council of Canada, and has served as a Director of the Society for the Policing of Cyberspace and the Calgary Police Museum Interpretive Centre.

 

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Whitney Lackenbauer 

P. Whitney Lackenbauer, Ph.D. (Calgary, 2004), is associate professor and chair of the department of history at St. Jerome’s University (University of Waterloo), Ontario, Canada. He is also a fellow with the Laurier Centre for Military Strategic and Disarmament Studies, the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies, the Centre for International Governance Innovation, and the Arctic Institute of North America.  Dr. Lackenbauer specializes in Arctic security and sovereignty issues, modern Canadian military and diplomatic history, and Aboriginal-military relations. 
 

As a Canadian International Council Research Fellow in 2008-09, Dr. Lackenbauer completed a report entitled From Polar Race to Polar Saga: An Integrated Strategy for Canada and the Circumpolar World (July 2009).  His recent books include Arctic Front: Defending Canada in the Far North (with Ken Coates, Bill Morrison, and Greg Poelzer, 2008) (winner of the 2009 Donner Prize for the best book on Canadian public policy), The Canadian Forces and Arctic Sovereignty: Debating Roles, Interests, and Requirements, 1968-1974 (forthcoming fall 2009), Battle Grounds: The Canadian Military and Aboriginal Lands (2007), and Aboriginal Peoples and the Canadian Military: Historical Perspectives (2007). 

 

His current research includes studies of the Canadian Rangers, the Distant Early Warning (DEW) Line, high modernism and social science in the Cold War Arctic, Aboriginal-military relations in British settler societies during the Second World War, and a comparative study of Native blockades and occupations.

 

Keywords: Circumpolar affairs, Arctic security, civil-military relations, military history, Aboriginal-state relations, Canadian foreign and defence policy 

 

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Philippe Lagassé

Philippe Lagassé is associate professor of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on Canadian defence policy and politics, civil-military relations in Westminster democracies, machinery of government related to foreign policy and national security affairs, and the nature and scope of executive power in the Westminster tradition. He holds a B.A. in philosophy from McGill University, an M.A. in war studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, and a Ph.D in political science from Carleton University. His academic articles have been published in Defense & Security Analysis, Defence and Peace Economics, Canadian Foreign Policy, Canadian Public Administration, International Journal, Diplomacy and Statecraft, Canadian Military Journal, and by the Institute for Research on Public Policy. He routinely offers an academic perspective on defence issues in Canadian media outlets, and he regularly contributes articles to newspapers and magazines, such as the Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Maclean's, La Presse, and Embassy Magazine. His work in the media and communications earned him the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Social Science award for media and community relations and the President's Award for Excellence in Media Relations in 2012.

 

Lagassé also works as a contract defence analyst for government, the armed forces, political parties, and industry. Notably, he has co-authored a report for the Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy) at the Department of National Defence (2004), has advised the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company Canada (2005), has served as a member of the Royal Canadian Navy's Strategic Advisory Group (2008-2009), recently served as a member of the defence procurement working group of Industry Canada's Aerospace Review (2012), and is currently an external advisor for the Office of the Auditor General of Canada and a member of the Independent Review Panel overseeing the evaluation of options to sustain Canada's fighter aircraft capabilities within the National Fighter Procurement Secretariat. In addition, he has given talks on Canadian defence policy and civil-military relations for the Canadian Forces College, the Canadian Forces Leadership Institute, the Office of the Judge Advocate General, the Conference of Defence Associations, Thales University, l'Institut des Hautes Études en Défense nationale (ministère de la Défense de France), and has testified before the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence.

 

Lagassé's current research focuses on the challenges confronting Canadian defence policy and procurement, and on the constitutional foundations of military command authority in Canada.

 

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Natalia Loukacheva 

Dr. Natalia Loukacheva is Canada Research Chair in ‘Aboriginal Governance and Law’ and Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Northern British Columbia (Canada). Prior to joining the Faculty she was a Research Associate at the Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto (2004-2013); the first visiting Fridtjof Nansen Professor of Arctic Studies, University of Akureyri, (Norway-Iceland initiative of the Ministries of Foreign Affairs, 2013). She is also Adjunct Professor at Osgoode Hall Law School LL.M. program on energy and infrastructure, York University, a Research Fellow with the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute (Ottawa), a Visiting Professor of Polar Law in Iceland, and Associate Scientist with Stefansson Arctic Institute. She was the founding Director of the Graduate Polar Law Program and taught Polar law at the University of Akureyri, Iceland (2008-2010). She holds a Doctor of Juridical Science (S.J.D.) from the Faculty of Law, University of Toronto (Toronto, Canada), a Doctor of Philosophy (law) from the Urals State Law Academy (Yekaterinburg, Russian Federation), and degree in Jurisprudence LL.B./LL.M. Cum Laude (with distinction) from the Urals State Law Academy.

 

Research Interests

Dr. Loukacheva specializes in international and comparative constitutional law, with research interest in the Arctic. She is the author of The Arctic Promise: Legal and Political Autonomy of Greenland and Nunavut (University of Toronto Press, 2007); the editor and project leader of the first ever Polar Law Textbook (Nordic Council of Ministers (NCM), TemaNord 538: 2010 www.norden.org ) and of the Polar Law Textbook II, ( NCM, TemaNord 535: 2013 www.norden.org ); special editor of the Yearbook of Polar Law, Vol. 2, 2010 (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, www.brill.nl/pola) and guest editor of the Arctic Review on Law and Politics, No. 2, 2012 (Gyldendal Akademisk Publishers, Oslo, Norway www.gyldendal.no/arcticreview). Since 2012 she also has served as an Associate editor of the Arctic Review on Law and Politics. In August 2013 she took part as an Arctic expert in the International Nansen Expedition on the Northern Sea Route; in September 2013 she was invited as an Arctic expert-lecturer on the Action Canada expedition to the North West Passage on board the Canadian icebreaker CCGS Louis S. St-Laurent; in 2012 she participated as an observer- Arctic expert at the Canadian Armed Forces Operation Nanook in Canada’s Western Arctic.


Dr. Loukacheva chairs an International Thematic Network group on Legal Issues in the Arctic of the Northern Research Forum www.nrf.is and Arctic Governance group of the Arctic Law Thematic Network of the University of the Arctic. She is actively involved in numerous Arctic and Polar law related activities and projects, conducts legal and multi-disciplinary research, field-work, teaching, editing, reviewing, consulting and organizing various Arctic related events, and has been speaking/presenting and advocating on Arctic and Polar law related topics since 1996. She is the author of numerous publications on legal and political issues in the Arctic, Polar law, Indigenous Peoples’ rights and governance in the North.

  

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George Macdonald   

Lieutenant-General (Retired) George Macdonald joined CFN Consultants in 2005 after serving 38 years in the Canadian Forces, culminating in the position of Vice Chief of the Defence Staff from 2001 to 2004, following three years as the Deputy Commander-in-Chief of NORAD.  As a Senior Partner with CFN, he focuses on clients with an interest in aerospace projects.

 

Initially, LGen Macdonald spent several years as an operational fighter pilot. He has commanded at the squadron, base/wing, and air division level. Throughout his career, he held many leadership positions in Ottawa, and has served with NATO forces in Germany and Norway, and with North American Aerospace Defence Command (NORAD) in both Winnipeg and Colorado Springs, Colorado. He also held the position of Director of Operations in the Foreign and Defence Policy Secretariat in the Privy Council Office.

 

In addition to his operational experience, LGen Macdonald has extensive executive-level expertise in military requirements and capability planning, all aspects of defence program management, corporate change management, international security issues, and Canada-U.S. relations. In his last position as Vice Chief of the Defence Staff, LGen Macdonald was the senior resource manager for DND and was responsible for strategic planning.

 

LGen Macdonald is a graduate of the University of Calgary and the National Defence College. He has been published on several topics, including change leadership, interoperability, knowledge management, ballistic missile defence, defence strategic planning and resource management, and CF operations in Afghanistan.  In addition to being a Fellow with the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, he is active as a board member with the Conference of Defence Associations Institute.


Keywords:
Canada-US issues, NORAD, ballistic missile defence, space issues, military capabilities, DND capital equipment spending, DND resource management, DND budget, domestic and continental security.

 

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Paul Maddison 

Paul Maddison served in the Royal Canadian Navy for 37 years, retiring in 2013 at the rank of Vice Admiral. During his naval service, which included 15 years at sea, he had the privilege to command the frigate HMCS CALGARY based in Esquimalt BC, and the destroyer HMCS IROQUOIS based in Halifax NS. He deployed to the Arabian Gulf during the Gulf War in 1990, and commanded at sea in the same region during Operation Enduring Freedom in 2003.            

 

On promotion to flag rank in 2006, he served as the Canadian Armed Forces Assistant Chief of Military Personnel. This was followed by promotion to Rear-Admiral in 2008 and appointment as Commander of Maritime Forces Atlantic in Halifax . On promotion to Vice Admiral in 2011, he was appointed Commander of the Royal Canadian Navy.            

 

A graduate of le College Militaire Royal de St-Jean and the Canadian Forces College, VAdm (Ret’d) Maddison’s decorations include: Commander of the Order of Military Merit (Canada), Commander of the Legion of Merit (United States) and Officer of the Legion d’honneur (France).            

 

Paul’s interests include geostrategic issues (with emphasis on maritime strategy), fitness, hockey, and history. He is currently President of Paul Maddison Consulting Inc. and holds Fellowships with both the Royal Canadian Geographic Society and the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute. He resides in Ottawa with his wife Fay (President/CEO of Natasha’s Wood Inc. and Founder of the Natasha’s Wood Foundation in support of First Responder families). They are proud parents of Audrey and Brendan.
 

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Pierre Martin 

Pierre Martin (Ph.D., Northwestern, 1991) is professor of political science and director of the Chair in American Political and Economic Studies at the Université de Montréal. He is a member and former director of the Université de Montréal/McGill Center for International Peace and Security Studies (CIPSS) and a research fellow at CÉRIUM, Montréal’s Centre for International Studies. In 1999-2000 he was the Mackenzie King Visiting Associate Professor at Harvard University, as well as a Fulbright Fellow. In 2008 he was a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in Washington, and a visiting lecturer at Beijing International Studies University. His research and teaching center on U.S. politics, international political economy, international relations and public opinion analysis. He has authored more than fifty articles in specialized books and journals and has edited or co-edited six volumes. In 2012, he won the Marcel Cadieux Distinguished Writing Award from the Canadian International Council for the best article published in 2012 by the International Journal. Professor Martin is a frequent commentator on political and international affairs in the French and English media. He has published numerous op-ed articles in French and English national newspapers and has been a guest columnist for the Toronto Star since 2006.

 

Web pages :

Université de Montréal: http://pol.umontreal.ca/repertoire-departement/vue/martin-pierre/

CERIUM: www.cerium.ca/Martin-Pierre

Centre for International Peace and Security Studies: http://cepsi-cipss.ca/en/membres/pierre-martin/

Toronto Star columnist page: www.thestar.com/unassigned/columnists/185539--martin-pierre

Follow Pierre Martin on Twitter : @pmartin_UdeM

 

Pierre Martin (Ph.D., Northwestern, 1991) est professeur titulaire de science politique et directeur de la Chaire d’études politiques et économiques américaines à l'Université de Montréal. Il est aussi membre et ancien directeur du Centre d’étude sur la paix et la sécurité internationale (CEPSI) des Universités de Montréal et McGill, et chercheur au CÉRIUM (Centre d’études et de recherches internationales de l’Université de Montréal). En 1999-2000, il était Mackenzie King Visiting Associate Professor à l'Université Harvard et boursier Fulbright. En 2008, il a été chercheur invité au Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, à Washington, et professeur invité à l’Université des langues étrangères de Pékin. Ses travaux et enseignements portent entre autres sur les États-Unis, les relations internationales, l'économie politique internationale et l'analyse de l'opinion publique. Il a signé plus de cinquante articles dans des revues ou des ouvrages spécialisés et il a dirigé ou co-dirigé six volumes. En 2012, il a reçu le prix Marcel-Cadieux du Conseil International du Canada pour le meilleur article publié dans la revue International Journal cette année-là. Le professeur Martin est fréquemment appelé par les medias écrits et électroniques pour commenter l’actualité politique ou internationale. Il a publié de nombreux articles d’opinion et d’analyse dans les principaux journaux français et anglais du Canada et il est chroniqueur invité au Toronto Star depuis 2006.

 

Sur Internet :

Université de Montréal : http://pol.umontreal.ca/repertoire-departement/vue/martin-pierre/

CÉRIUM : http://www.cerium.ca/Martin-Pierre

Centre d’études sur la paix et la sécurité internationale: http://cepsi-cipss.ca/membres/pierre-martin/

Toronto Star : http://www.thestar.com/unassigned/columnists/185539--martin-pierre

Twitter : @pmartin_UdeM

 

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Kyle Matthews 

Kyle Matthews is the Senior Deputy Director of Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies at Concordia University, and is the President of the Canadian International Council's Montreal branch. His work focuses on human rights, international security, the Responsibility to Protect, global threats, and social media and technology. He works closely with the Canadian All-Party Parliamentary Group for the Prevention of Genocide and has advised Members of Parliament on issues related to international peace and security. He previously worked for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, where he was posted to the Southern Caucasus (Tbilisi), the Democratic Republic of the Congo (Kinshasa) and Switzerland (Geneva). Prior to that he worked for CARE Canada in Albania and later at its headquarters in Ottawa, where he managed various humanitarian response initiatives and peace-building projects in Afghanistan, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East. In 2011 he joined the New Leaders program at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. He is a member of the University Club of Montreal, the Montreal Press Club, the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations and the Federal Idea, a think tank devoted to federalism. He blogs on international affairs for Global News and for the Canadian International Council’s website opencanada.org.

 

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Robert Muggah

Dr. Robert Muggah is the Research Director of the Igarapé Institute, a Research Director of the SecDev Foundation, and teaches at the Instituto de Relações Internacionais, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro. He is also a fellow at the University of Oxford and the Graduate Institute's Center for Conflict, Development and Peacebuilding in Switzerland. He is the co-founder and executive editor of Stability Journal. Dr. Muggah also works with UN agencies, the World Bank, and Google Ideas on issues related to fragility, conflict and violence and ways new technology can help. Dr. Muggah received his DPhil at Oxford University and his MPhil at the Institute for Development Studies (IDS), University of Sussex. He received his BA from the University of Kings College and Dalhousie University.

 

From Brazil Robert directs several projects on international cooperation, peace-support operations, transnational organized crime, and cyber-security in Latin America and the Caribbean. He currently oversees the Humanitarian Action in Situations Other than War (HASOW) project, the States of Fragility project and the Urban Resilience project. He routinely advises governments, international organizations and civil society groups on security and development issues. For example, in 2012 and 2013 he was an adviser to the High Level Panel on the post-2015 development agenda and the Global Commission on Drug Policy. In 2013, he was named one of the top 100 most influential people in the world on armed violence reduction by a UK-based organization. 


Previously, Dr, Muggah was research director at the Small Arms Survey (2000-2011), a lecturer at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies and an advisor to a number of multilateral and bilateral organizations on issues of arms control, security sector reform, migration, and stabilization and reconstruction. He has led research and evaluations in over 30 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, North Africa and the Middle East, South Asia and the South Pacific on related themes. His recent policy outputs includes chapters for forthcoming flagship reports of the Inter-American Development Bank, UNDP, World Bank and others like the Urban Dilemma (2012) for IDRC and DFID, advisory support to the World Bank's World Development Report (2011), the UNDP's Governance for Peace report (2012), and others by the OECD-DAC.

Dr. Muggah's work is published in dozens of academic and policy journals. Most recently, he is the editor of Stability Operations, Security and Development (New York: Routledge, 2013) and co-editor of the Global Burden of Armed Violence (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011). He is also the author of Security and Post-Conflict Reconstruction: Dealing with Fighters in the Aftermath of War (New York: Routledge, 2009), Relocation Failures in Sri Lanka: A Short History of Internal Displacement (London: Zed Books, 2008), and No Refuge: The Crisis of Refugee Militarization in Africa (London: Zed Books 2006) and has contributed more than 14 chapters to the Small Arms Survey since 2001. 

 

Dr. Muggah has published over one hundred articles in peer-review journals including International Peacekeeping, Security Dialogue, Contemporary Security Policy, The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs, Conflict, Security and Development, The Journal of Refugee Studies, The Journal of Disasters, Forced Migration Review, and many others. In addition to featuring in international media and writing opeds for the NYT, LAT, Guardian, Huffington Post, Atlantic and others, Dr. Muggah has also been involved in co-writing and advising documentary films on violence, drug policy and development. Most recently, he has been designing new interactive online visualization tools of the global arms trade, as well as android applications to enhance police accountability from Rio de Janeiro to Nairobi and Cape Town.   

 

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John Noble

John J. Noble graduated from Acadia University in Wolfville, N.S. with a B.A. (Honours Political Science) in 1966, and immediately joined the Department of External Affairs where he worked for 35 years in Ottawa and abroad at Canadian missions in Dakar; Ankara; London; Geneva. In Ottawa he served as Official Spokesman and Director of the Press Office; Director U.S. Relations Division; Director General U.S. Relations Bureau; the International Security and Arms Control Bureau and the International Organizations Bureau. He was appointed Canadian Ambassador to Greece in 1993; Minister Plenipotentiary to France in 1994, and concurrently Consul General of Canada to Monaco; Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein in 1998 and concurrently as Permanent Observer of Canada to the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, France. After retiring in July 2001 he was named a Fulbright Scholar at Michigan State University in 2002. From 2003 to 2005 served as Director of Research and Communications at the Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University. He is a Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University; a Senior Distinguished Fellow of the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University; a Senior Associate at the Centre for Trade Policy and Law; and a Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation.  He has written numerous articles on various aspects of Canadian foreign policy and from 2007 to 2009 served as a Chief Federal Negotiator and Minister’s Special Representative for land claims in British Colombia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Nunavut. From 2006 to 2009 he served as President of the Retired Heads of Mission Association (RHOMA). From 2005 to 2012 he served on the Board of the Conference of Defence Associations Institute.  He was elected president of the National Capital Branch of the Canadian International Council in June 2011 for a two year term. He was named a Fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute in 2012.
 

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Roland Paris

Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa. He is also founding Director of the Centre for International Policy Studies and Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His research interests are in the fields of international security, international governance and foreign policy.

Before joining the University of Ottawa in 2006, Prof. Paris was Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country's largest think tank; foreign policy advisor in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Privy Council Office of the Canadian government; Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder; and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. He has won two awards for public service and four awards for teaching.

 

Prof. Paris’ writings have appeared in leading academic journals including International Security and International Studies Quarterly. His research has earned international distinctions and citations, including the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, which he received for At War’s End: Building Peace After Civil Conflict (Cambridge University Press, 2004). He has co-edited two other books on peacebuilding, and is the co-editor of the Security & Governance book series at Routledge.

 

In 2012, Prof. Paris was appointed a Global Ethics Fellow by the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs in New York. He is a member of the board of directors of the World University Service of Canada, and serves on the editorial boards of several academic journals. He lectures around the world and is a regular commentator on international affairs in traditional and new media.

 

He holds a Ph.D. from Yale University, an M.Phil. from Cambridge University, and a B.A. from the University of Toronto.

 

Keywords: International Security, International Governance, Multilateralism, Peacebuilding

 

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Joël Plouffe

Joël Plouffe is a researcher at CIRRICQ (Center for Interuniversity Research on the International Relations of Canada and Québec) at the École nationale d’administration publique (ENAP) in Montréal, managing editor of the ArcticYearbook (www.arcticyearbook.com), and is a U.S. State Department International Visiting Program Alumnus (IVLP Arctic Security). His research interests include security and defense, geopolitics of the Arctic, regions of the circumpolar North, Northern Québec, and U.S.-Canada relations and foreign policy.

 

Mr Plouffe is involved in various northern research groups and programs. He is a member of the Northern Research Forum’s Thematic Network on Geopolitics and Security (www.nrf.is), led by Dr Lassi Heininen from the University of Lapland (Finland); is actively involved in the annual Calotte Academy that takes place in the Barents Euro-Arctic Region; and is a project member of ArcticNet’s group on Climate Change and Commercial Shipping in the Arctic, led by Dr Frédéric Lasserre of Université Laval in Québec City (Canada). In August 2012, Joël Plouffe was embedded with Canada’s National Defense and Canadian Forces in the Western Arctic (Northwest Territories) during the annual ‘Operation Nanook’. 

 

Mr Plouffe has conducted research in the Arctic regions of Russia, the US (Alaska), Norway (Svalbard and mainland), Finland, Sweden and Canada (Nunavik, Northwest Territories). He has also delivered addresses and lectures in many international venues and was an invited Arctic expert at the National Assembly of France and the German Bundestag in 2010. That same year, he pursued oil and gas research in Norway’s High North with international experts from the Bodø Graduate School of Business and also addressed key ministers at the European Parliament on non-Arctic state interests and policies for the Arctic region. He has also collaborated with the Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC on issue of Arctic geopolitics.

 

In 2013, Mr Plouffe serverd as Visiting Professor at the Jackson School for International Studies (JSIS) at the University of Washington in Seattle, where he was co-teaching a Task Force on Arctic Security. He was also Visiting Scholar at NYU’s Center for Global Affairs (CGA) in Spring 2013, as part of the Polar Politics program led by Dr Carolyn Kissane at the School of Continuing Professional Studies (NYU-SCPS). He was also Visiting Scholar at Western Washington University in 2010 where he was invited to teach Québec Politics and Contemporary Issues while pursuing research at the Canadian-American Studies Center.

 

Joël Plouffe was born in the mining town of Sudbury in Northern Ontario, Canada, and is now living in Montréal, Québec where he is working on his PhD thesis at UQAM, looking at how the Arctic has influenced US foreign policy making from the Nixon presidency to President Barack Obama’s first mandate.

 

Keywords: Arctic Geopolitics and Security, Circumpolar Affairs, Barents/EU Arctic, Canada-US Relations and Foreign Policies, Globalization in the Arctic, Northern Québec/Nunavik.

 

Twitter : @joelplouffe

Linkedin : http://www.linkedin.com/in/joelplouffe

Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/Arcticyearbook


 

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Colin Robertson 

 

A former Canadian diplomat, Colin Robertson is Senior Strategic Advisor for  McKenna, Long and Aldridge LLP working with the Canadian Council of Chief Executives. He is Vice President and Senior Research Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute.  He is an Honorary Captain (Royal Canadian Navy) assigned to the Strategic Communications Directorate.

 

Living in Ottawa, Robertson writes and speaks on international affairs. He is a regular contributor to the Globe and Mail . Embassy Magazine named him to  their “Top Eighty Influencing Canadian foreign policy” in 2012 and 2013.

 

Robertson sits on the boards of  the Conference of Defence Associations Institute and North  American Research Partnership. He is vice chair of Canada World Youth. He is a past president of the Canadian International Council’s National Capital Branch. Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (NPSIA) at Carleton University, Robertson is a former member of Carleton’s President’s Advisory Council and a current member of the NPSIA Advisory Council. He is honorary chair of the Canada Arizona Business Council. He is a member of the Pacific Council on International Policy, the Retired Heads of Mission Association, and the Sir Winston Churchill Society of Ottawa.

 

A career foreign service officer from 1977-2010, he served as first Head of the Advocacy Secretary and Minister at the Canadian Embassy in Washington and Consul General in Los Angeles, with previous assignments as Consul and Counsellor in Hong Kong and in New York at the UN and Consulate General. In his final assignment he directed a project at Carleton University’s Centre for Trade Policy and Law with the support of the Federal and Provincial Governments and the private sector on Canada-US Engagement. A member of the team that negotiated the Canada-US FTA and NAFTA he is co-author of Decision at Midnight: The Inside Story of the Canada-US FTA (1996). He is co-editor of Diplomacy in the Digital Age: Essays in honour of Ambassador Allan Gotlieb (2011). He has taught at Carleton University, Queen’s University Public Executive Program and the Canada School of Public Service. He served as president of the Historica Foundation. He was editor of bout de papier: Canada’s Journal of Foreign Service and Diplomacy and president of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers.

 

Robertson was awarded the Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012),Alberta Centennial Medal (2005), the Saskatchewan Centennial Medal (2006), the Alberta Motion Picture Industry Association ‘Friend of the Industry’ (2004), and the distinguished alumnus award from the University of Manitoba (2004 ).

 

Robertson was given the “Hot Potato Award” for helping to increase collaboration between U.S. and Canada organizations and stakeholders at the 2012 Pacific NorthWest Economic Region (PNWER) Summi.

 

His smartest decision was marrying his wife Maureen Boyd, a Vancouverite, former journalist and communications consultant. They have three children, Allison, Sean and Conor. Robertson reads voraciously, runs, swims, cycles, cross-country skis. A series of what Lemony Snicket would describe as ‘unfortunate circumstances’ have left him with low vision. This  has obliged him to give up  tennis,  a sport he enjoyed but played badly.

 

Colin can be reached by email at cr@colinrobertson.ca or 613-6191867

 

website www.colinrobertson.ca

 

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Stephen Saideman

Stephen Saideman holds the Paterson Chair in International Affairs at Carleton University’s Norman Paterson School of International Affairs.  His research interests are in the fields of international security, comparative foreign policy, civil-military relations, and ethnic conflict.   

 

Before joining Carleton University, Prof. Saideman was Canada Research Chair in International Security and Ethnic Conflict.  Prior to that, Prof. Saideman spent 2001-2002 on the U.S. Joint Staff working in the Strategic Planning and Policy Directorate as part of a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship.  He has also taught at Texas Tech University and the University of Vermont.  He has won two awards for teaching.   

 

He has written The Ties That Divide: Ethnic Politics, Foreign Policy and International Conflict; For Kin or Country: Xenophobia, Nationalism and War (with R. William Ayres); and NATO in Afghanistan: Fighting Together, Fighting Alone (with David Auerswald).  He has written on nationalism, ethnic conflict, civil war, and civil-military relations in leading academic journals, including International Organization and International Studies Quarterly.   

 

Professor Saideman writes online at OpenCanada.org, Political Violence at a Glance, Duck of Minerva and his own site (saideman.blogspot.com).  He also tweets too much at @smsaideman.  He has also appeared in more traditional media (newspapers, television and radio) in Canada and the U.S.

 

He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, which is where he also earned his M.A.  He received his B.A. from Oberlin College.

 

  

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Hugh Segal

Senator Hugh Segal, C.M., is a former Chief of Staff to the Prime Minister of Canada, Associate Cabinet Secretary (policies and priorities) in Ontario and a former President of the Institute for Research on Public Policy. A former Chair of the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs, a member of the recent Special Senate Committee on Terrorism.  He is a Senior Fellow of the Queens School of Policy Studies, and a Member of both the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies in London, and of the Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance in Stockholm. He is also Senior Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute in Calgary, and a regular Lecturer on Defence Policy at the Canadian Forces Staff College in Toronto. A graduate in history from the University of Ottawa, Senator Segal is an honorary captain in the Canadian Navy and holds  honorary doctorates in law from the Royal Military College of Canada  He sits on a range of private, public and not-for-profit boards of directors, and is Senior Research Fellow at the McMillan law firm in Canada.

 

Keywords: National security, foreign policy

 

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Elinor Sloan

Elinor Sloan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University, Ottawa, and is a former defence analyst with Canada’s Department of National Defence. She is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada (BA), the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton (MA), and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (PhD).

 

Dr. Sloan's research interests include: the defence policies and military capabilities of Canada, the United States, major NATO allies, Australia and China; homeland security and defence, NORAD, space and ballistic missile defence, and the Arctic; and, contemporary strategic thought.

 

Her books include The Revolution in Military Affairs (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002); Security and Defence in the Terrorist Era (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005 & 2010); Military Transformation and Modern Warfare (Praeger Publishers, 2008); and Modern Military Strategy (Routledge, 2012).

 

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian Forces, US defence policy, homeland defence, ballistic missile defence, defence transformation, NATO, NORAD

 

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Gary Soroka 

Born in Montréal, Gary Soroka was educated in Canada and the University of Edinburgh where he received his PhD in Political Philosophy. He joined the Department of External Affairs in 1976, and served at Headquarters in the Political and Strategic Analysis Division, the Cabinet Liaison Division, the Policy Planning Secretariat, the Personnel Bureau and the Consular Policy Division.

 

He became Director of Political and Security Policy in the Policy Planning Bureau in September 1993, and senior policy advisor in 1995.

 

Dr. Soroka has served abroad in Canadian Embassies and Consulates in Washington, New Delhi, London, San José Costa Rica and Berlin. In 1986-87, he was the Canadian Exchange Officer in the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs in Canberra, Australia.

           

Dr. Soroka spent most of his career within the Department as a specialist in the area of foreign policy: he worked on four major foreign policy reviews during his career as well as on many specific policy issues. In 1990, he was brought back from India on special duty to develop the central concepts for a major review of Canadian security policy. In 1993, he was brought back from London on special duty to work on a task force looking at the role of, and appropriate structures for, a forward-looking, relevant and adaptable foreign ministry. In 1993, he was awarded the first ever Minister’s Award for Foreign Policy Excellence.

 

Dr. Soroka was one of the Department’s lead foreign policy speechwriters, and he has written many speeches for Canadian Prime Ministers, Foreign Ministers, Ambassadors and senior officials on diverse foreign policy subjects.

 

Dr. Soroka is married to Sabine Sparwasser, a member of the German Foreign Service, and they have two children. He currently divides his time between Berlin and Toronto.

 

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Hugh Stephens

Mr. Stephens has more than 35 years of government and business experience in the Asia-Pacific region. Based in Victoria, BC, Canada, he is currently Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada and Vice Chair of the Canadian Committee for Pacific Economic Cooperation (CanCPEC). After serving for a number of years as Senior Vice President, Public Policy (Asia Pacific), for Time Warner, where he was based at the company’s Asia regional headquarters in Hong Kong, Mr. Stephens until recently continued to serve Time Warner in an advisory capacity as Senior Advisor on Public Policy for Asia Pacific and Canada. Mr. Stephens has extensive experience in dealing with media and IT industry issues (protection of intellectual property, improved market access, regulatory issues) in China, India, SE Asia, Korea/Japan and elsewhere in Asia.

 

Mr. Stephens has been an active leader in a number of regional business organizations. Until recently he served on the Executive Committee of the Board of the US National Center for APEC and is a past Executive Committee Board member of the US-Korea Business Council. He was a member of the Board of Directors of the US-ASEAN Business Council for a number of years.  He is also a past Governor of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hong Kong and Vice Chair of the Quality Brands Protection Committee, a coalition of more than 180 multinational companies engaged in strengthening IPR protection in China. He served two terms as a Governor of the Cable and Satellite Broadcasting Association of Asia.

In February 2012, Mr. Stephens was appointed to a new position as Executive-in-Residence at the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada, in Vancouver. Executives in Residence are industry leaders with experience and knowledge on Asia who provide thought leadership through research, events and activities with the Foundation. He is also a Fellow of the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute and Vice President of the Victoria Branch of the Canadian International Council. 

 

Prior to entering the corporate world with Time Warner in 2000, Mr. Stephens served for almost 30 years in the Canadian Foreign Service, reaching the position of Assistant Deputy Minister for Policy and Communications in the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa. He also served abroad as Canadian Representative in Taiwan (Director-General of the Canadian Trade Office in Taipei), Counsellor and Charge d’affaires at the Canadian Embassies in Seoul, Korea and Islamabad, Pakistan, among a number other overseas and headquarters assignments, including service at the Canadian Embassy in Beijing and Mandarin language training in Hong Kong.

 

Mr. Stephens was educated at UBC (BA-Hons), University of Toronto (B.Ed) and Duke University (MA), and has a Certificate in Mandarin from the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

 

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David Curtis Wright

David Curtis Wright is Associate Professor in the Department of History and Senior Research Fellow of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary, where he specializes in imperial Chinese history and the Mongol world empire.  Dr. Wright spent three formative years in Taiwan, and after returning to North America went on to graduate magna cum laude with  baccalaureate degrees in History and Chinese language.  He earned his MA and PhD degrees in East Asian Studies at Princeton University and also spent one year learning classical Mongolian language at Harvard.  He is the author of two books and several articles on imperial China and its relations with the "barbarians," or northern nomadic peoples.  His next book will be on the Mongol conquest of China in the late thirteenth century. 

 

Keywords: Chinese History, Mongol World Empire  

 

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