CDFAI - Senior Research Fellows

 
 

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Senior Fellows

Current Senior Research Fellows listing:

 

Barry Cooper

Rob Huebert

Elinor Sloan

Daryl Copeland

Philippe Lagassé    

Hrach Gregorian

Roland Paris

 

 

Frank Harvey

David Pratt

 

 

 

 

Barry Cooper

Barry Cooper, a fourth generation Albertan, was educated at Shawnigan Lake School, the University of British Columbia and Duke University (PhD, 1969). He taught at Bishop's University, McGill, and York University before coming to the University of Calgary in 1981. He has been a visiting professor in Germany and the United States. His teaching and research has tried to bring the insights of Western political philosophers to bear on contemporary issues, from the place of technology and the media in Canada, to the debate over the constitutional status of Quebec and Alberta, to current military and security policy. Cooper has published 30 books and over 150 articles and papers that reflect the dual focus of his work; most recently (with Lydia Miljan) he wrote Hidden Agendas: How Canadian Journalists Influence the News published by UBC Press (2003). In the spring of 2004, New Political Religions: An Analysis of Modern Terrorism was published by the University of Missouri Press. In 2009 he edited Tilo Schabert’s  How World Politics is Made: France and the Reunification of Germany.  He publishes a regular column in the Calgary Herald and other CanWest Global papers.

Cooper has lectured extensively in Europe, the United States, India, Australia and China. He has received numerous on-going research grants from public and private Canadian, French, German, and American granting agencies. In addition he has received two major awards, the Konrad Adenauer Award from the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung, and a Killam Research Fellowship.

He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies at the University of Calgary.

Keywords:
Terrorism, Canadian defence and security policy, Canada-US relations

 

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Daryl Copeland

Daryl Copeland, Senior Fellow at the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute, is an analyst, author, educator and consultant specializing in the relationship between science, technology, diplomacy, and international policy. His book, Guerrilla Diplomacy: Rethinking International Relations, was released in 2009 by Lynne Rienner Publishers and is cited as an essential reference by the editors of Oxford Bibliographies Online. A frequent public speaker, Mr. Copeland comments regularly for the national media on global issues and public management, and has written over 100 articles for the scholarly and popular press. His work has appeared in many anthologies, as well as in the International Journal, World Politics Review, Foreign Policy in Focus, The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, Place Branding and Public Diplomacy, The Globe and Mail, Toronto Star, Ottawa Citizen, Embassy, The Mark, iPolitics and elsewhere. He was awarded the 2010 Molot Prize for best article published in Canadian Foreign Policy (“Virtuality, Diplomacy and the Foreign Ministry”, 15:2).


From 1981 to 2011 Mr. Copeland served as a Canadian diplomat with postings in Thailand, Ethiopia, New Zealand and Malaysia. During the 1980s and 1990s, he was elected a record five times to the Executive Committee of the Professional Association of Foreign Service Officers. From 1996-99 he was National Program Director of the Canadian Institute of International Affairs in Toronto and Editor of Behind the Headlines, Canada’s international affairs magazine. In 2000, he received the Canadian Foreign Service Officer Award for his “tireless dedication and unyielding commitment to advancing the interests of the diplomatic profession.”

Among his positions at the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade (DFAIT) in Ottawa, Mr. Copeland has worked as Senior Intelligence Analyst, South and Southeast Asia; Deputy Director for International Communications; Director for Southeast Asia; Senior Advisor, Public Diplomacy; Director of Strategic Communications Services; and, Senior Advisor, Strategic Policy and Planning. He was DFAIT representative to the Association of Professional Executives (APEX) 2001-06.

 

Mr. Copeland teaches at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs, and is Visiting Professor at the London Academy of Diplomacy (UK) and Otago University (NZ). He serves as a peer reviewer for University of Toronto Press, Canadian Foreign Policy, the International Journal and The Hague Journal of Diplomacy, and is a member of the Editorial Board of the journal Place Branding and Public Diplomacy. From 2009-11 he was Adjunct Professor and Senior Fellow at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs. In 2009 he was a Research Fellow at the University of Southern California’s Center on Public Diplomacy.

 

Mr. Copeland grew up in downtown Toronto, and received his formal education at the University of Western Ontario (Gold Medal, Political Science; Chancellor’s Prize, Social Sciences) and the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs (Canada Council Special MA Scholarship). He has spent years backpacking on six continents, and enjoys travel, photography, arts and the outdoors.

 

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Hrach Gregorian 

Hrach Gregorian is President of the Washington D.C.-based research organization, the Institute of World Affairs (IWA). He is member of the Graduate Faculty, School of Peace and Conflict Management, Royal Roads University; Adjunct Professor and Research Fellow, Centre for Military and Strategic Studies, University of Calgary; Adjunct Professorial Lecturer, School of International Service, American University; Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Global Studies, University of Victoria; and Senior Fellow, Canadian Defence & Foreign Affairs Institute. For over three decades Gregorian has been active in deep cultural and risk analysis in fragile states, with field experience in Africa, the Middle East, the Balkans, Central and East Asia.
 
Gregorian served as one of the founding directors of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP). He developed the Institute’s first professional training program in conflict analysis and negotiation. The course was offered to senior members of the US State Department, USIA, Voice of America, and USAID. A similar course was developed for foreign affairs officials in Angola, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Nigeria and Thailand. He is also one of the co-founders of the Alliance for Peacebuilding, the largest US-based membership organization of institutions and professionals in the field of peace and conflict management.
 
Gregorian’s work on stability and peace operations in fragile states has taken him to twenty-five plus countries. For the May 2010 meeting in Gatineau of G8 Senior Officials, he prepared and presented the analytical paper on effectiveness and coherence of G8 security sector capacity building efforts in vulnerable states. His current publications have focused on interagency coordination in peace operations, capacity-building in fragile states, and energy and conflict.
 
Gregorian’s op-ed pieces have appeared in U.S. and Canadian newspapers. He has made presentations before professional societies, academic institutions, government agencies, and on television and radio. He has been awarded research and applied project grants by foundations and government agencies in the North America and Europe. He is the recipient of American University’s Capital Area Peacemaker Award, and a Boston University Distinguished Alumni Award. He sits on various boards.
 
Gregorian earned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at Brandeis University, and his B.A. at Boston University. He and his wife of 38 years, Judith Lynn (Kramer), reside in Vienna, Virginia and are the parents of three grown children.

 

Keywords: International Conflict Management, Post-Conflict Peacebuilding, Capacity Building

 

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Frank P. Harvey

Frank P. Harvey was appointed Eric Dennis Memorial Chair of Government and Politics in 2013 (Dalhousie University), and held the position of University Research Professor of International Relations from 2008-2013. He served as Associate Dean of Research in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences (2011-2013), held the 2007 J. William Fulbright Visiting Research Chair in Canadian Studies, served as Director of the Centre for Foreign Policy Studies, and is currently a Senior Research Fellow with the Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute. His most recent book, Explaining the Iraq War: Counterfactual Theory, Logic and Evidence (2011, Cambridge University Press) received the 2013 Canadian Political Science Association Book Prize in International Relations. His other books include The Homeland Security Dilemma: Fear, Failure and Future of American Insecurity (2008, Routledge); Smoke and Mirrors: Globalized Terrorism and the Illusion of Multilateral Security (University of Toronto Press, 2004) – Runner-up 2004-05 Donner Book Prize, and finalist 2005-2006 Harold Adam Innis book prize; Millennium Reflections on International Studies (co-edited with Michael Brecher, University of Michigan Press, 2002); Using Force to Prevent Ethnic Violence: An Evaluation of Theory and Evidence (with David Carment, Praeger, 2001); Conflict in World Politics: Advances in the Study of Crisis, War and Peace (co-edited with Ben Mor, Macmillan Press 1998); and The Future’s Back: Nuclear Rivalry, Deterrence Theory and Crisis Stability After The Cold War (McGill-Queen’s, 1997). He has published widely on post-9/11 security, the Iraq war, American foreign and security policy, nuclear and conventional deterrence, coercive diplomacy, proliferation, crisis decision-making, protracted ethnic conflict and national missile defence in International Studies Quarterly, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Journal of Politics, International Journal, International Negotiation, Security Studies, International Political Science Review, Canadian Journal of Political Science, and Conflict Management and Peace Science (among others). His commentaries have appeared in the Globe and Mail, National Post, iPolitics, Calgary Herald, Ottawa Citizen, and Chronicle Herald. Professor Harvey received Dalhousie’s Alumni Association Award for Excellence in Teaching (2012), Dalhousie’s Outstanding Graduate Advisor Award (2009), the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Award for Excellence in Teaching (1998), and the Burgess Research Award (2000). He was a NATO Research Fellow from 1998-2000 and has received several grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Department of National Defence and the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

  

Keywords: Globalization and terrorism, unilateral vs. multilateral approaches to security, comparative multilateralism, WMD proliferation, US & Canadian foreign, security and defence policy, homeland and continental security, ballistic missile defence, nuclear and conventional deterrence, NATO military strategy and third-party intervention, peacekeeping and humanitarian intervention

 

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Rob Huebert 

Rob Huebert is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Calgary. He is also the associate director of the Centre for Military and Strategic Studies. He was a  senior research fellow of the Canadian International Council and a fellow with Canadian Defence and Foreign Affairs Institute. In November 2010, he was appointed as a director to the Canadian Polar Commission Dr. Huebert has taught at Memorial University, Dalhousie University, and the University of Manitoba. His area of research interests include: international relations, strategic studies, the Law of the Sea, maritime affairs, Canadian foreign and defence  policy, and circumpolar relations. He publishes on the issue of Canadian Arctic Security, Maritime Security, and Canadian Defence. His work has appeared in International Journal; Canadian Foreign Policy; Isuma- Canadian Journal of Policy Research and Canadian Military Journal.. He was co-editor of Commercial Satellite Imagery and United Nations Peacekeeping and Breaking Ice: Canadian Integrated Ocean Management in the Canadian North. His most book written with Whitney Lackenbauer and Franklyn Griffiths is Canada and the Changing Arctic: Sovereignty, Security, and Stewardship. He also comments on Canadian security and Arctic issues in both the Canadian and international media.

 

Keywords: Canadian arctic security and sovereignty, maritime security, environmental security, Canadian defence policy 

 

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Philippe Lagassé

Philippe Lagassé is associate professor of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa. His research focuses on Canadian defence policy and politics, civil-military relations in Westminster democracies, machinery of government related to foreign policy and national security affairs, and the nature and scope of executive power in the Westminster tradition. He holds a B.A. in philosophy from McGill University, an M.A. in war studies from the Royal Military College of Canada, and a Ph.D in political science from Carleton University. His academic articles have been published in Defense & Security Analysis, Defence and Peace Economics, Canadian Foreign Policy, Canadian Public Administration, International Journal, Diplomacy and Statecraft, Canadian Military Journal, and by the Institute for Research on Public Policy. He routinely offers an academic perspective on defence issues in Canadian media outlets, and he regularly contributes articles to newspapers and magazines, such as the Globe and Mail, Ottawa Citizen, Maclean's, La Presse, and Embassy Magazine. His work in the media and communications earned him the University of Ottawa's Faculty of Social Science award for media and community relations and the President's Award for Excellence in Media Relations in 2012.

 

Lagassé also works as a contract defence analyst for government, the armed forces, political parties, and industry. Notably, he has co-authored a report for the Assistant Deputy Minister (Policy) at the Department of National Defence (2004), has advised the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company Canada (2005), has served as a member of the Royal Canadian Navy's Strategic Advisory Group (2008-2009), recently served as a member of the defence procurement working group of Industry Canada's Aerospace Review (2012), and is currently an external advisor for the Office of the Auditor General of Canada and a member of the Independent Review Panel overseeing the evaluation of options to sustain Canada's fighter aircraft capabilities within the National Fighter Procurement Secretariat. In addition, he has given talks on Canadian defence policy and civil-military relations for the Canadian Forces College, the Canadian Forces Leadership Institute, the Office of the Judge Advocate General, the Conference of Defence Associations, Thales University, l'Institut des Hautes Études en Défense nationale (ministère de la Défense de France), and has testified before the House of Commons Standing Committee on National Defence.

 

Lagassé's current research focuses on the challenges confronting Canadian defence policy and procurement, and on the constitutional foundations of military command authority in Canada.

 

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Roland Paris

Roland Paris is University Research Chair in International Security and Governance at the University of Ottawa. He is also founding Director of the Centre for International Policy Studies and Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. His research interests are in the fields of international security, international governance and foreign policy.

Before joining the University of Ottawa in 2006, Prof. Paris was Director of Research at the Conference Board of Canada, the country's largest think tank; foreign policy advisor in the Department of Foreign Affairs and the Privy Council Office of the Canadian government; Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Colorado-Boulder; and Visiting Researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. He has won two awards for public service and four awards for teaching.

 

Prof. Paris’ writings have appeared in leading academic journals including International Security and International Studies Quarterly. His research has earned international distinctions and citations, including the Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order, which he received for At War’s End: Building Peace After Civil Conflict (Cambridge University Press, 2004). He has co-edited two other books on peacebuilding, and is the co-editor of the Security & Governance book series at Routledge.

 

In 2012, Prof. Paris was appointed a Global Ethics Fellow by the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs in New York. He is a member of the board of directors of the World University Service of Canada, and serves on the editorial boards of several academic journals. He lectures around the world and is a regular commentator on international affairs in traditional and new media.

 

He holds a Ph.D. from Yale University, an M.Phil. from Cambridge University, and a B.A. from the University of Toronto.

 

Keywords: International Security, International Governance, Multilateralism, Peacebuilding

 

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David Pratt

David Pratt is an independent consultant. Most recently, he spent five months in Baghdad, Iraq as a Senior Parliamentary Expert with the USAID sponsored Iraq Legislative Strengthening Program – currently the largest legislative capacity building project in the world. From 2004-2008, he served as Special Advisor to the Secretary General of the Canadian Red Cross (CRC) where his focus was on humanitarian issues. He also led the CRC’s ‘Auxiliary to Government’ project which promoted a new relationship between the CRC and governments at all levels. Mr. Pratt served as an elected representative at the municipal, regional and federal levels for 16 years. He was first elected to the House of Commons in 1997 and was Chair of the Standing Committee on National Defence and Veterans Affairs from 2001 to 2003. He served as Canada’s 36th Minister of National Defence in 2003-04.

 

Related article:

Former Canadian Defence Minister appointed as Honorary Consul for Sierra Leone

 

Keywords: Conflict prevention, small arms and light weapons control, international humanitarian law, war-affected children, security sector reform

 

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Elinor Sloan 

Elinor Sloan is Professor of International Relations in the Department of Political Science at Carleton University, Ottawa, and is a former defence analyst with Canada’s Department of National Defence. She is a graduate of the Royal Military College of Canada (BA), the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton (MA), and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University (PhD).

Dr. Sloan's research interests include: the defence policies and military capabilities (army, navy, air force) of Canada, the United States, major NATO allies, Australia and China; NORAD and ballistic missile defence; and the Arctic.

 

Her books include The Revolution in Military Affairs (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002); Security and Defence in the Terrorist Era (McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005 & 2010); Military Transformation and Modern Warfare (Praeger Publishers, 2008); and Modern Military Strategy (Routledge, 2012).

 

Keywords: Canadian defence policy, Canadian Forces, Canadian military, Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, Canadian Army, US defence policy, US military, ballistic missile defence, NATO, NORAD, China military, rare earths, satellites, RADARSAT, Arctic, space

 

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